High School Language Arts Milestones

Ninth and Tenth Grade Students will be able to:

  • critique the logic of functional documents by examining the sequence of information
  • generate relevant questions about reading on issues that can be researched.
  • use clear research questions and suitable research methods that elicit and present evidence from primary and secondary sources
  • use appropriate conventions when writing
  • write expository compositions, including analytical essays and research reports, as well as persuasive compositions
  • use appropriate conventions
  • analyze characteristics of subgenres that are used in plays, poetry, prose, novels, short stories, essays, and other basic genres
  • analyze the way in which the theme or meaning of a selection represents a view or comment on life
  • analyze both the features and the rhetorical devices of different types of public documents
  • write responses to literature
  • demonstrate control of grammar, diction, paragraph and sentence structure, and an understanding of English usage

Eleventh and Twelfth Grade Students will be able to:

  • apply their knowledge of word origins to determine the meaning of new words encountered in reading materials and use those words accurately
  • apply knowledge of Greek, Latin, and Anglo-Saxon roots and affixes to draw inferences concerning the meaning of scientific and mathematical terminology
  • read and understand grade-level-appropriate material
  • analyze both the features and the rhetorical devices of different types of public documents (e.g., policy statements, speeches, debates, platforms) and the way in which authors use those features and devices
  • critique the power, validity, and truthfulness of arguments set forth in public documents
  • analyze characteristics of subgenres (e.g., satire, parody, allegory, pastoral) that are used in poetry, prose, plays, novels, short stories, essays, and other basic genres
  • analyze the way in which authors through the centuries have used archetypes drawn from myth and tradition in literature, film, political speeches, and religious writings (e.g., how the archetypes of banishment from an ideal world may be used to interpret Shakespeare’s tragedy Macbeth)
  • write fictional, autobiographical, and biographical narratives
  • write responses to literature
  • write reflective compositions
  • write historical investigations.
  • write job applications and resumes

This information has been adapted from the California State Board of Education’s web site and was adopted by the California State Board of Education, December 1997.